I have many readers who have growing families and are interested in scheduling, and who have asked me what my schedule looked like when we had fewer children. How did I get things done, and what about when there aren’t any “helpers” really yet.  So in this post I’ll share with you ten of my past schedules when we had 2 children, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 9 children, to give you a window as to what those days were like for us.  And the additional schedules may give growing families a window in to what having a larger family of varying sizes can look like.  *smile*

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NOTE: 
This is a lengthy post which isn’t necessarily intended for you to read in it’s entirety.  
It’s intended for people to be able to read examples of schedules that pertain to where their own family is presently or may be soon.  Having examples was so helpful go me when I first began scheduling our family.
And by the way, keeping old schedules really helps when trying to remember what you did with children at certain ages, or for when encouraging a friend with ideas.

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How I’ve scheduled in the past with fewer children  
I’ll start with sharing the schedule I used when we had only 2 children, and work up in numbers in children from there.  I’ll explain a little about each schedule (below it) as some items listed may be unclear to someone other than me; I often used “code” words for myself, to help words fit in to the small spaces that I would understand, but someone else wouldn’t.  You may want to enlarge the schedule(s) that interests you and print it out so that you can view it while reading the explanations about it written below the schedule in the blog.  I’ve listed more than one schedule for certain numbers of children, like two different schedules for “3 children”, because there was a large difference in what we were doing as baby got older from a newborn to a toddler.  If you click on the schedules you can enlarge them once or two times to be able to read them better for the ones you’re interested in…
TWO  CHILDREN – ages 3, 2 

 

Explanation:

  • 6:00 am – “day prep.” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 8:30 am – “character development” was Character First curriculum.
  • 10:00 am – “preschool” was selecting one preschool activity off of our Preschool Activities Idea List that I wrote up for myself, to save in having to brain storm all the time what we should do; and to avoid getting in to a rut.
  • 10:30 – “family business” would have been things off of my to-do list.
  • 12:00 – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 1:00 “Contracts Co.” was work I was doing very part time from home for my dad.  If I had any to do that day then this was when I would do it.
  • 6:30 pm – “couch time” was when my husband, Bob, and I would sit on the couch together for conversation while the children played independently on the floor in the same room.  The intent was for the children to receive security in seeing mommy and daddy together, having loving conversation daily.
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THREE  CHILDREN – ages 4, 3, 3 mo.

 

Explanation:

  • At the very top, above Brandon’s name, “4-hr. schedule” meant that he was at an age and ability to be eating regularly about every four hours.
  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing.
  • 6:00 am – “day prep.” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 9:00 am – “character development” was Character First curriculum;  “preschool” was selecting one preschool activity off of our Preschool Activities Idea List that I wrote up for myself, to save in having to brain storm all the time what we should do; and to avoid getting in to a rut.
  • 10:30 am – “family business” would have been items off of my to-do list.
  • 11:30 am – “learning video” would have been something age-appropriately educational either that we owned or which I got at the library (not a movie for simple entertainment).
  • 12:30 – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 7:00 pm – “couch time” was when my husband, Bob, and I would sit on the couch together for conversation while the children played independently on the floor in the same room.  The intent was for the children to receive security in seeing mommy and daddy together, having loving conversation daily.
  • Listed on the bottom, for Sundays, “family picnic” was having a picnic-food-type of dinner (peanuts or cheese, popcorn, veggies or fruit) on a blanket in the family room and watching a family movie together.
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THREE  CHILDREN – ages 6, 5, 18 mo.

Explanation:

  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 5:00 am – this also included “day prep.” which meant making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 6:00 am – “time with God” was reading my Bible and prayer.
  • 8:00 am – “Jesus time” would have been a Bible lesson with the children.  “Play pen” or pack-n-play time for children between the ages of about 18 mo.- 2 1/2 years is in a larger-than-usual size pack-n-play, approximately 3-foot square; more space for walkers.
  • 10:00 am – Character First is a curriculum for developing character; “Explode the Code” was a language arts workbook.
  • 11:30 am – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 12:00 pm – we alternated which subject we studied during that time block in order to avoid requiring that our little kindergartners sit and do curriculum for too long at that age.
  • 4:00 pm – “activity cupboard” was having the girls select an educational activity to do from the activity cupboard (not just run around and play in general at that time).
  • Listed on the bottom, for Sundays, “family picnic” was having a picnic-food-type of dinner (peanuts or cheese, popcorn, veggies or fruit) on a blanket in the family room and watching a family movie together.
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FOUR  CHILDREN – ages 7, 6, 3, nb

Explanation:

  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 5:30 am – “day prep.” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 8:00 am – Breakfast took an hour because I kept the children at the table with an activity after they ate while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.
  • 9:00 am – “Explode the Code” was a language arts work book; “Jesus time” was a Bible lesson; Character First is a curriculum for developing character; then we alternated days for science and history/geography in order to avoid requiring that our little kindergartners sit and do curriculum for too long at that age.
  • 12:30 pm – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 1:30 pm – “you and me time” was when I would alternate having a one-on-one with one of the girls at a time, while the other had a play-alone time in her room.
  • 2:30 pm – “QT” was my Bible study time (Quiet Time); sometimes this hour had to be for a nap, as I was expecting our 5th baby already (Anna Marie and Riley would be exactly 12 mo. and 1 day apart), plus I was still feeding Anna Marie during the night still so was very tired during the day.  I had Bible study as much as possible, but also gave myself grace if I just had to sleep.  It was a season; God understands.  *smile*
  • 5:00 pm – “daddy tidy time” was when the older children and I would tidy up the house before daddy got home from work, so that he could arrive home to order and quiet.
  • Listed on the bottom, for Sundays, “family picnic” was having a picnic-food-type of dinner (peanuts or cheese, popcorn, veggies or fruit) on a blanket in the family room and watching a family movie together.
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FOUR  CHILDREN – ages 8, 7, 3, 8 mo.

Explanation:

  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 5:30 am – this included “day prep.” which meant making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • At the very top, above Anna Marie’s name, “5-hr. schedule” meant that she was at an age and ability to be eating regularly about every five hours.
  • 6:30 am – “QT” was my Bible study time (Quiet Time).
  • 8:30 am – Karen & Melanie would prepare Brandon’s “Towel Time” activities for him (for 9:00 am); Anna Marie had some play time in a Play Yard, which is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
  • 10:00 am – MCP was a language arts workbook.
  • 10:30 am – “room time” for Brandon meant that he played in his room alone for that hour (and other kids at 3:00 and 4:00).
  • 5:00 pm – “dinner helpers” rotated depending upon the day:  Mon. was Karen, Wed. was Melanie, and Thurs. was Brandon.
  • 6:00 pm – “daddy tidy time” was when the older children and I would tidy up the house before daddy got home from work, so that he could arrive home to order and quiet.
  • Listed on the bottom, for Sundays, “family picnic” was having a picnic-food-type of dinner (peanuts or cheese, popcorn, veggies or fruit) on a blanket in the family room and watching a family movie together.
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FIVE  CHILDREN – ages 8, 7, 4, 1, nb

Explanation:

  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.  (The highlighting that is lighter on the left half of this schedule was a printer error when I made this schedule initially).
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 5:30 am – this also included “day prep.” which meant making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • At the very top, above Riley’s name, “3 1/2-hr. schedule” meant that he was at an age and ability to be eating regularly about every 3 1/2 hours.
  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • 10:00 am – MCP was a language arts workbook; Anna Marie played in a Play Yard, which is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
  • 12:00 pm –  I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch (and breakfast) while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 12:00 pm – Karen would feed Anna Marie for me while I did lunch.
  • 2:30 pm – Karen & Melanie would alternate who would be doing learning activities on the computer, and who would be playing in the girls’ bedroom by themselves.
  • 5:30 pm – Anna Marie played in a Play Yard, which is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
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FIVE  CHILDREN – ages 9, 8, 4, 21 mo., 9 mo.

Explanation:

  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 5:30 am – “QT” was my Bible study time (Quiet Time).
  • 6:00 am – “day prep.” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away (as this is my primary source of communication with family/friends), and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 9:00 am – FlashMasteris a hand-held electronic flashcards tool for which is awesome (I’d highly, highly recommend it); “audio book” meant sitting on the couch with a CD or tape player and head phones listening to an audio book that we either owned or had gotten from the library; “table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.  Since Anna Marie’s table activity at this time was with me, I’d choose something specific I could help her learn (such as phonics, or “cracker math” where we’d learn all kinds of math concepts by using 20 crackers, or coloring which developed the muscles in her hands aiding in easier handwriting later on, or looking through a family photo album together and talking about it.)
  • 9:30 am – Morning jobsKaren’s “clean stove top” meant giving it a good scrub (we wiped it off after using it every time, but it got a thorough scrub once-a-week).  “Dust kit. counters” meant behind all of the appliances and entire counter top.  Melanie’s “clean kitchen faces” job meant washing down the fronts of the cupboards in the kitchen from drips or food spills, as well as the dishwasher “face”, refrigerator, and microwave.  Brandon’s jobs of “reorder toys and boys” meant cleaning out toys from the toy baskets that didn’t belong there and putting them where they did belong, and straitening out the book shelves; “door knobs and lights” means using a cleaning wipe to wipe down all of the door knobs for germs, and light switch plates for dirt; “clean table and chairs” means using a cleaning cloth to wipe those items down from food spills and drips; “fold laundry” for him meant only a couple of easy items from the older girls’ baskets, such as wash cloths, pants, and cleaning cloths; “clean sinks” happened with a cleaning wipe.  Then for Riley’s “jumper” time, Brandon would sit and play with him for a while while Riley jumped, to keep Riley company, and keep Brandon occupied *chuckle* *wink*.
  • 11:00 am – “Towel Time” activities was where Brandon played with preschool type activities on 3 different towels for 30 min.; Play Yardis like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
  • 11:30 am – “preschool” was selecting one preschool activity off of our Preschool Activities Idea List that I wrote up for myself, to save in having to brain storm all the time what we should do; and to avoid getting in to a rut.
  • 12:00 pm –  I kept the children at the table with an activity after a meal while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 1:00 pm – “phone calls, organize, email” meant my to-do list.
  • 2:00 pm – “MCP and Wordly Wise” were language arts work books.
  • 5:00/5:30 pm – Play Yard is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
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SIX  CHILDREN – ages 10, 9, 6, 3, 2, nb

 

Explanation:

  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 6:00 am – “QT” was my Bible study time (Quiet Time).
  • 6:30 am – “day prep.” (which actually took some of my “shower” time, too) included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  •  8:00 – Morning jobs Karen’s “clean stove top” meant giving it a good scrub (we wiped it off after using it every time, but it got a thorough scrub once-a-week).  “Dust kit. counters” meant behind all of the appliances and entire counter top.  Melanie’s “spot clean kitchen floor” meant cleaning up obvious sticky spots with a cloth when the entire floor did not necessarily need to be mopped in it’s entirety; “clean kitchen faces” job meant washing down the fronts of the cupboards in the kitchen from drips or food spills, as well as the dishwasher “face”, refrigerator, and microwave.  “clean glass” meant all of the mirrors, sliding glass door, and stereo cabinet glass door.  Brandon’s jobs of “reorder toys and boys” meant cleaning out toys from the toy baskets that didn’t belong there and putting them where they did belong, and straitening out the book shelves; “door knobs and lights” means using a cleaning wipe to wipe down all of the door knobs for germs, and light switch plates for dirt; “clean table and chairs” means using a cleaning cloth to wipe those items down from food spills and drips; “clean sinks/faucets” happened with a cleaning wipe.
  • 10:00 am – “Towel Time” activities was where Riley played with preschool type activities on 3 different towels for 30 min. (and at 11:30 for Anna Marie).
  • 10:30 am – “book corner” for Brandon meant sitting in the corner of the family room where our large floor pillows were and looking at books quietly.  Anna Marie’s “Table activity” was anything that could be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 11:00 am – Play Yard is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
  • 12:00 pm – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 3:00 pm – “read aloud” was my reading aloud educational books to the children.
  • 5:30 pm – “table activities” sometimes meant individual activities like mentioned above at lunch time, but often times with the 3 older kids it meant playing with Thinking Putty.  At this time of day it was an organized activity to keep every one productively occupied together while I fed the baby (I do not like to have to stop feeding a baby to manage kids’ behavior or relationships).
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SEVEN  CHILDREN – ages 11, 10, 6, 4, 3, 2, nb

 

Explanation:

  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  •  5:30 am – “day prep” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 7:30 am (and 12:00 pm) –  “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 8:00 am – Morning jobsKaren’s “clean stove top” meant giving it a good scrub (we wiped it off after using it every time, but it got a thorough scrub once-a-week).  “Dust kit. counters” meant behind all of the appliances and entire counter top.  Melanie’s “nap/pencil sharp” meant refill the napkin basket, and empty the electric pencil sharpener.  “Spot clean kitchen floor” meant cleaning up obvious sticky spots with a cloth when the entire floor did not necessarily need to be mopped in it’s entirety; “clean kitchen faces” job meant washing down the fronts of the cupboards in the kitchen from drips or food spills, as well as the dishwasher “face”, refrigerator, and microwave.  “clean glass” meant all of the mirrors, sliding glass door, and stereo cabinet glass door.  Brandon’s jobs of “reorder toys and boys” meant cleaning out toys from the toy baskets that didn’t belong there and putting them where they did belong, and straitening out the book shelves; “door knobs and lights” means using a cleaning wipe to wipe down all of the door knobs for germs, and light switch plates for dirt; “clean table and chairs” means using a cleaning cloth to wipe those items down from food spills and drips; “clean sinks/faucets” happened with a cleaning wipe.
  • 9:00 am – “Towel Time” activities was where Riley played with preschool type activities on 3 different towels for 60 min.
  • 12:00 pm – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.
  • 12:30 pm – Karen does the serving, and Karen and Melanie together cleaned up.
  • 2:00 pm – “computer/organize” meant some computer learning time, and some to-do list time (which was often organization *smile*).
  • 6:00 pm – Karen would load the dishes after Melanie cleared the table.
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NINE  CHILDREN (added twins) – 12, 11, 7, 5, 4, 2, 1, nb (x2)

 Explanation:

  • Light highlighting across rows – I started doing this so that I could see where each of the children would be while I was feeding the baby.  Everyone needed to be productively occupied as I was not willing to have the baby’s eating and holding time with me interrupted to have to deal with behavior issues when kids made poor choices knowing that I was occupied.
  • Bold print – I put in bold type all of the academic learning we do through out the day so that I can see at a glance how much we’re doing; I also wanted meals to stand out to my eye so I could see what happened between blocks of time such as breakfast and lunch.
  • 6:00 am –  “day prep” included making the bed, opening all of the blinds in the house, sorting and starting a load of laundry, glancing at email to see if there was anything I needed to answer or address right away, and glance at my calendar and to-do list for the day.
  • 7:00 am – Morning jobsKaren’s “clean stove top” meant giving it a good scrub (we wiped it off after using it every time, but it got a thorough scrub once-a-week).  “Dust kit. counters” meant behind all of the appliances and entire counter top.  Melanie’s “nap/pencil sharp” meant refill the napkin basket, and empty the electric pencil sharpener.  “Spot clean kitchen floor” meant cleaning up obvious sticky spots with a cloth when the entire floor did not necessarily need to be mopped in it’s entirety; “clean kitchen faces” job meant washing down the fronts of the cupboards in the kitchen from drips or food spills, as well as the dishwasher “face”, refrigerator, and microwave.  “clean glass” meant all of the mirrors, sliding glass door, and stereo cabinet glass door.  Brandon’s jobs of “reorder toys and boys” meant cleaning out toys from the toy baskets that didn’t belong there and putting them where they did belong, and straitening out the book shelves; “door knobs and lights” means using a cleaning wipe to wipe down all of the door knobs for germs, and light switch plates for dirt; “clean table and chairs” means using a cleaning cloth to wipe those items down from food spills and drips; “clean sinks/faucets” happened with a cleaning wipe.
  • 8:30 am – “Table activity” is anything that can be played with easily at the table, such as books, wood puzzles, few match box cars, couple of dinosaurs, sewing letters, an electronic phonics game, a few Duplo leggos, dolly with clothes, etc.
  • 9:00 am – Riley’s “blanket activity” was actually “Towel Time” but combined on to one large blanket instead of 3 beach towels.  Riley played with preschool type activities for 60 min.  For him playing on a single blanket worked better and 3 towels; Play Yard for Tyler is like a very large play pen enabling her to play within boundaries unsupervised.
  • 12:30 pm – I kept the children at the table with an activity after lunch (and after breakfast) while I cleaned up, so that I wasn’t trying to manage their behavior and activities while simultaneously; I’d get totally cleaned up, and then we’d all leave the kitchen/table together in to the next thing.
  • 1:00 pm –  “Play pen” or pack-n-play time for children between the ages of about 18 mo.- 2 1/2 years is in a larger-than-usual size pack-n-play, approximately 3-foot square; more space for walkers.
  • 1:30 pm – “play alone time prep.” meant each person gathering what they would need for their 2-hour time of playing independently (i.e. disc players for audio books or music, chapter books, legos, dolls, a lap top, letter writing materials, etc.), so that no one was needing to be wandering around the house getting additional items later.  If some children were walking around, the others would hear that person and they would all start coming out of their play alone times, too, wondering what they were missing out on.  So we had a strict rule about getting to play alone times and then staying put where they each chose to be.  If they later found that they didn’t have something they thought they needed then they just had to go without that day and work with what they had with them already.
  • 8:00 pm – Riley stayed up later (and got up earlier in the morning) than the rest of the children because he didn’t need as much sleep as the other kids, and I needed him to still have a nap time every afternoon for 2 hours.  By taking a couple of hours off of his night time I could stick those on to his afternoon instead.
I hope that looking at some of my past schedules when we had fewer children is helpful to you if you have a smaller family.  Catching a vision for how a family can live live proactively – ON PURPOSE – can make all the difference in how your journey progresses.  It did for us. *smile*
If you would like to have any of my charts, lists, or schedules that I’ve shared you can download those from this link.
Blessings on your efforts!
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